• Virginia

Liberty Mixing Room

Summary:

Liberty University’s Center for Cinematic Arts is designed to engage students actively in the digital and media delivery revolution that is transforming all areas of contemporary culture. Course offerings provide both conceptual and practical experience as well as world class professional training facilities and equipment. When the Center’s new Liberty Mixing Room (the only THX certified dubbing stage in an institution world-wide) was constructed, Liberty University turned to Acoustical Solutions for a turnkey sound control treatment.

Application Introduction:

The Zaki Gordon Cinematic Arts Center launched in Spring 2012. All students who graduate from the center will have written and directed their own short film; compiled a professional reel of their work; written, polished and formed a business plan for their own screenplay; and will have a credit on a long format film. One of the most coveted facilities in the Cinematic Arts Center is their THX certified mixing room, the only THX certified dubbing stage in an institution world-wide. This mixing room required many acoustical considerations to become THX certified. Proper acoustical treatment to prevent transmission of foreign sound into the room, as well as keep the room as sound absorbent and silent as possible, had to be carefully planned and installed.

Treatment Provided:

The walls of the mixing room are an AcoustiWall Fabric Stretch System, which provides floor to ceiling sound absorption, preventing reverberation and deadening the space. Iso-Step® Floor Underlayment was also installed beneath the flooring of the room. The IIC or impact insulation class of the Iso-Step® Floor Underlayment is rated high – meaning footfall noise is absorbed.  Mason Industries Isolation Hangers decouple the ceiling, soundproofing against structure borne noise. The IAC Acoustics Noise-Lock® Doors complete the project, making the entrances and exits as soundproof as a sealed wall when closed.

Results:

According to the center’s executive director Stephan Schultze, classroom attendance caps were raised twice last year to 60 students per class, to accommodate interest in the program. Last fall, the program’s three introductory core classes — screenwriting, motion picture directing and cinematography — welcomed 120 students each. Last semester, the program held three workshops featuring industry professionals including Kirk Cameron, whose session took place in the THX mixing room. “(Students) will have been trained using industry standard equipment from ‘Red’ camera packages to Avid edit bays, to ProTools and THX certified surround sound mixing experience,” Schultze says, “they will not only know how to make a movie, but will know how to make a living doing it.”